Enjoy some delicious recipes!

Program #1014

Marie Hegler
Kale and Sweet Potato Salad

1 medium sweet potato, peeled and diced
1/4 cup + 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 teaspoon salt, divided Freshly ground black pepper
4 cups thinly sliced kale
1/4 cup chopped pecans, toasted
1/4 dried cranberries
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon honey

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
2. Spread sweet potatoes on a baking sheet, drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil, and sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste. Bake at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for 20 minutes, turning halfway through.
3. In a large mixing bowl, toss together sweet potatoes, kale, pecans, and cranberries.
4. In a small mixing bowl, whisk together 1/4 cup olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, lemon juice, and honey. Drizzle over kale mixture, tossing to mix.

Yield: 6 servings

Stovetop Chicken and Rice

2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1/2 cup diced onion
1 cup medium-grain white rice
2 cups broccoli florets
2 cups shredded rotisserie chicken
Salt and freshly ground pepper
2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
1/ 4 cup sour cream
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
4 ounces dill Havarti cheese, cubed
1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
2. Melt the butter in a large oven proof skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until soft, about 2 minutes. Add rice and cook for a minute, stirring frequently. Add broccoli, chicken, salt and pepper to taste; stir to combine.
3. Whisk the chicken broth and sour cream in a bowl, pour into the skillet and bring to a simmer. Stir in half each of Parmesan and Havarti. Cover tightly with a lid or aluminum foil, transfer to the oven, and bake until the rice is tender and most of the liquid is absorbed, about 20 minutes.
Turn on the broiler. Uncover the skillet and sprinkle with the remaining cheeses, then broil until golden, about 2 minutes.

Yield: 6 servings

Marie Hegler
Clemson Cooperative Extension
www.facebook.com/FNHClemson
carol@clemson.edu

Salt in Antiquity

While salt is cheap today, it used to be worth its weight in gold. Historians believe that Roman soldiers were once paid with salt. In fact, the word 'salary' comes from the Latin word 'salarium,' or payment in salt. During the late Roman Empire, salt was carried across 400 miles of the Sahara desert by caravans of as many as 40,000 camels. It was that important to humanity!
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