Enjoy some delicious recipes!

Program #628

Spinach and Bacon Frittata

1 tsp olive oil
3 slices bacon
1/3 cup grated parmesan cheese
1 small yellow onion, finely diced
1/2 cup milk
6 whole eggs
salt and pepper to taste
1 cup shredded Bruder Basil Cheese
2 cups lightly packed spinach leaves, washed, dried

Place olive oil in large frying pan. Saute' bacon until crisp. Transfer bacon to plate and drian. Add onion and saute until carmelized. Add spinach and saute until spinach is soft. Add bacon back into the skillet.

Break eggs in bowl, beat eggs and add milk and cheese. Blend thoroughly. Pour egg mixture over spinach, bacon mixture. Move eggs away from the sides of the pan. Add more oil under the egg mixture if needed. At this point you can put the pan into a preheated 350 degree oven and finish cooking until the eggs are set. When eggs are nearly done, you can add the parmisian cheese to the top of th frittata and cook until cheese has melted.

Slide frittata out onto a plate and cut into wedges, or flip over into a plate and serve in wedges. Garnish with fresh herbs and tomatoes.

Decadent French Toast Casserole with Praline Syrup

1 loaf French bread
8 large eggs
2 cups half and half
1 cup milk
2 tbsp sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
dash salt
praline topping
maple syrup

Slice french bread into 20 slices, 1 inch thick. Generously batter a 13x9 inch oven-proof baking dish. Arrange slices in two rows, overlapping the slices. In large bowl, combine eggs, half and half, milk, sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt. Beat with wire whisk until blended but not bubbly.

Pour mixture over french bread slices, making sure that all slices are covered evenly with the mixture. Cover and refrigerate.

The next day, preheat oven to 350. Spread praline topping evenly over the bread adn bake for 40 minutes. Serve with maple syrup.

Praline Topping

2 sticks butter
1 cup packed light brown sugar
1 cup chopped pecans
2 tbsp light corn syrup
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
light sprinkling of nutmeg

combine all ingredients in medium bowl and blend well.

Linda Weiss


Salt in Antiquity

While salt is cheap today, it used to be worth its weight in gold. Historians believe that Roman soldiers were once paid with salt. In fact, the word 'salary' comes from the Latin word 'salarium,' or payment in salt. During the late Roman Empire, salt was carried across 400 miles of the Sahara desert by caravans of as many as 40,000 camels. It was that important to humanity!