Enjoy some delicious recipes!

Program #736

Susan Nicholson

Salmon Dijonnaise

1 salmon portion
1 tablespoon dijonnaise sauce
2 teaspoons dill, finely chopped
1 tablespoon panko bread crumbs
2 tablespoons chopped walnuts

Place salmon on a baking dish. Spread dijonnaise over salmon. Sprinkle dill, then bread crumbs, then walnuts on top of salmon. Bake at 400 degrees for 15 minutes.

Cod with Pistachio Basil Butter

2 cod fillets (6-8 oz. each)
1/4 cup fresh basil leaves
1/4 cup pistachios
1 clove garlic
1/4 cup butter
1 teaspoon lemon juice
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Lemon wedges for garnish

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place fish in well oiled baking dish. Place pistachios, basil, and garlic in food processor or blender and process until finely chopped. Add butter, lemon juice, salt and pepper and process into a smooth paste.

Spread 2-3 tablespoons of pistachio butter on each piece of fish. You can refrigerate leftover pistachio butter for several days to use as a spread or toss with pasta.

Bake fish in preheated oven, uncovered, until fish flakes easily with a fork, about 10-12 minutes. Serve garnished with basil leaves and lemon wedges.

Tilapia Almandine

2 lbs. tilapia fillets
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 teaspoons salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
1/2 cup all purpose flour
1/4 cup margarine or butter, melted
1/2 cup blanched sliced almonds
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
1/8 teaspoon liquid hot pepper sauce

Sprinkle fish with lemon juice, salt and pepper. Dredge fish in flour. In a 10-inch frying pan, place fish in a single layer in melted margarine or butter; cook over moderate heate for 4 to 5 minutes ore until brown; turn carefully. Cook 4 to 5 minutes longer or until fish is brown and flakes easily when tested with a fork. Drain on absorbent paper; remove fish to a warm serving platter. Saute almonds in remaining margarine until lightly browned; add parsley and pepper sauce. Serve over fish. Serves 6.


Salt in Antiquity

While salt is cheap today, it used to be worth its weight in gold. Historians believe that Roman soldiers were once paid with salt. In fact, the word 'salary' comes from the Latin word 'salarium,' or payment in salt. During the late Roman Empire, salt was carried across 400 miles of the Sahara desert by caravans of as many as 40,000 camels. It was that important to humanity!
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