Enjoy some delicious recipes!

Program #831

Rhonda Matthews

Easy Caesar Salad  

3/4 cup olive oil
3 tablespoons vinegar
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1/4 teaspoon dry mustard powder
Salt and pepper to taste
1 bunch romaine lettuce, rinsed and torn
Combine first 6 ingredients in blender until smooth.
Drizzle dressing over lettuce and toss to coat.
Sprinkle dressed salad with shredded parmesan cheese before serving.

No Noodle Lasagna

2 pounds ground beef
1 teaspoon minced garlic
2 teaspoons Italian seasoning
8 ounce can tomato sauce
2 pounds zucchini, sliced thin
15 ounces ricotta cheese
2 eggs, beaten
8 ounces Mozzarella cheese, shredded
1/2 cup Parmesan cheese
Brown ground beef with garlic and Italian seasoning.
Drain fat from ground beef.
Add tomato sauce to cooked beef and bring to simmer.
Cook until the meat sauce is very thick.
Mix ricotta cheese, parmesan cheese and eggs until well combined.
Assemble layers in baking dish in this order:
Layer of sliced zucchini
Layer of meat sauce
Layer of cheese mixture
Continue building layers until all ingredients are used up.
Top with mozzarella cheese. Cover loosely with foil Bake at 325°F 30-45 minutes.
Remove foil and bake additional 15 minutes until cheese is lightly golden.

Lemon Garlic Asparagus

This easy side dish is perfect for pairing with rich entrees.
Fresh asparagus is one of the first fresh vegetables to be in season during the Spring.
Look for the best prices then.

1 pound fresh asparagus, rinsed and trimmed
1 teaspoon (heaping) minced garlic
Juice from half a lemon
Olive oil

Warm olive oil to medium high heat in a sauté pan.
Add fresh asparagus spears and stir constantly for 2-3 minutes.
Add minced garlic to pan and continue cooking an additional 1-2 minutes.
Add lemon juice to pan and stir to coat vegetables.
Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve warm.
Variations: Omit olive oil and cook asparagus in butter.

Clemson University Cooperative Extension
clemson.edu/hgic
Rhonda Matthews
rhonda@clemson.edu


Salt in Antiquity

While salt is cheap today, it used to be worth its weight in gold. Historians believe that Roman soldiers were once paid with salt. In fact, the word 'salary' comes from the Latin word 'salarium,' or payment in salt. During the late Roman Empire, salt was carried across 400 miles of the Sahara desert by caravans of as many as 40,000 camels. It was that important to humanity!
831